Our Work and Priorities

The University of Georgia created the Stripling Irrigation Research Park (SIRP) to be an innovative irrigation research and education center. The park is an easily accessible facility to offer assistance for farmers in irrigation management as well as to provide general information to the public regarding the role of water in the regional economy.

Scientists, engineers, and extension specialists collaborate with the staff and administration of the park to define crop water needs and improve food, feed, and fiber production using efficient irrigation methods. Industry partners are able to test equipment and water conservation strategies for Georgia under the objective eye of the college’s researchers. SIRP provides educational opportunities and demonstrations for farmers, irrigation companies, as well as students in local technical colleges and universities. Additionally, we often collaborate with the local Mitchell County Extension Office staff. 

Agricultural water conservation is at the forefront of topics in southwest Georgia with the increasing frequency of drought periods and increasing water demands throughout the Apalachicola – Chattahoochee – Flint (ACF) River Basin. Thus, the mission of the Stripling Park has included conservation ideals since its inception. With the ongoing “water wars” over water flow and demand in the ACF River Basin, maximizing efficiency and conservation efforts in this region has become a priority.

About us


We investigate the latest production and technological practices, striving for producer profitability and sustainability.
Research and Education Centers (RECs) are hubs for innovation and discovery that address the most critical issues facing agricultural production throughout the state. Ultimately, our findings are shared with stakeholders through the extension and outreach efforts of the University of Georgia College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences.
colistin (1) CAES News
UGA researcher instrumental in ban of last-resort agricultural antibiotic in Lebanon
Colistin is one of the world’s most important antibiotics, but its overuse has contributed to the rise of antimicrobial resistance, “one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity,” according to the World Health Organization. In an effort to preserve colistin’s efficacy, the U.S. does not use it in food animals, and now, thanks to the efforts of University of Georgia Professor Issmat Kassem, Lebanon has followed suit, banning it for agricultural use in that country.
University of Georgia entomology graduate students witnessed countless members of the Photuris frontalis — or snappy sync — firefly species blinking in unison in north Georgia earlier this month. (Photo by Horace Zhang) CAES News
Rare fireflies sync up in north Georgia
Standing in the new darkness of a 100-acre wood on a recent summer evening, a group of University of Georgia entomology graduate students witnessed magic in the air — literally — as thousands of fireflies of different species rose from the forest floor to flash their luminescent love songs to hopeful mates hiding below.